The Gaelic Harp — Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

No musical instrument has ever had to carry so much baggage, surely, as the Irish harp. It has been the symbol both of Ireland under English rule and of the Irish Free State. Unadorned, on a green background, it was a rebel flag in 1916. While its earliest origins are lost, the Irish harp has…

via The Gaelic Harp — Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

Galloping across the steppes — TwilightBeasts

Around 50 million years ago, long before the Epoch of the Twilight Beasts, a little mammal, Eohippus, scurried about in the forests of North America. This creature, about the size of an average dog, was the ancestor of the magnificent horse we know today. During this Period, called the Eocene, the environment and climate was […]

via Galloping across the steppes — TwilightBeasts

Fewer Students Are Majoring in History, But We’re Asking the Wrong Questions About Why — TIME

From debates over Confederate monuments to battles over America’s leadership in the world, understanding today’s contemporary challenges requires historical knowledge and historical perspective. Yet a new report by Benjamin Schmidt and the American Historical Association has revealed that a much smaller percentage of American college students are majoring in history than did in the past.…

via Fewer Students Are Majoring in History, But We’re Asking the Wrong Questions About Why — TIME

These Canadians flew in a secret WWII mission to destroy German dams – thestar.com

by Ted Barris – Excerpt from Dam Busters – via msn.com

a group of people in uniform posing for a photo: Sixteen of the surviving Dam Busters were pictured at the English airfield the day they returned from the raid. All in this photo were Canadian except American Joe McCarthy (second from right in back row), who had trained in Canada.
© Provided by Toronto Star Newspapers Limited Sixteen of the surviving Dam Busters were pictured at the English airfield the day they returned from the raid. All in this photo were Canadian except American Joe McCarthy (second from right in back row), who had trained in Canada.

On May 16, 1943, an unprecedented operation was launched by Squadron 617 of the Royal Air Force. The mission was to destroy three German dams in the Ruhr Valley with a new kind of bomb, dropped from a low-flying Lancaster, to cause flooding and chaos, disrupt key industries and possibly shorten the Second World War. In Dam Busters, Ted Barris tells the dramatic story with a focus on the large number of pilots, engineers, navigators and bombers on the mission who were Canadian or trained in Canada.

Read Ted Barris’s full article here to learn more about these brave young Canadians and how their efforts helped stem German advances and lead Canada and the Allies to victory.