Waiting for the Party to Start — Walking with Aki

Aki had to wait in the car while I dropped someone off at the hospital. There is not enough time this morning for a proper walk so I drive to the parking lot for our local radio station with plans to walk on the wetlands drained by Salmon Creek. The roar of in bound traffic […]

via Waiting for the Party to Start — Walking with Aki

Choreographed? — nature has no boss

Four American Avocets seemed to have choreographed this move just for the camera. They were just milling about when all of a sudden a couple took to the air for a brief hop, skip and jump. It was one of those photos you just didn’t know you took until you see it.. Fun stuff.

via Choreographed? — nature has no boss

Eastern Collared Lizard — Sonoran Images

You may enlarge any image in this blog by clicking on it. Click again for a detailed view. The other afternoon I set out to find a specific subject to photograph — an Eastern Collared Lizard. It had been a couple of years since I’d photographed one of these lizards and I was determined to […]

via Eastern Collared Lizard — Sonoran Images

Do Not Cross Me I Have My Fancy Pants On Today! — Through Open Lens

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 200. Snowy Egret What did the triangle say to the circle? You are pointless! Interesting Fact: Male Snowy Egrets fight for breeding territories, choose nest sites, and perform noisy courtship displays to attract mates. A ring of other egrets often gathers around a displaying male as he pumps his body up and […]

via Do Not Cross Me I Have My Fancy Pants On Today! — Through Open Lens

It’s Electrifying! — Through Open Lens

F/8.0, 1/1000, ISO 200. Monk Parakeets What do you get when you cross a parrot and a centipede? A walkie-talkie. Interesting Fact: Monk Parakeets in North America live in urban and suburban environments, especially around city parks. They are one of the few parrot species able to survive temperate-zone winters. In their native range in […]

via It’s Electrifying! — Through Open Lens

‘Reconstruction’ begins of stone age lands lost to North Sea – The Guardian

Scientists to create 3D map of submerged Mesolithic landscape of Doggerland

Part of the North Sea, covering the Doggerland land bridge, showing present-day Norway, top, and Denmark, below.
Part of the North Sea, covering the Doggerland land bridge, showing present-day Norway, top, and Denmark, below. Photograph: Nasa/AFP/Getty

Lost at the bottom of the North Sea almost eight millennia ago, a vast land area between England and southern Scandinavia which was home to thousands of stone age settlers is about to be rediscovered.

Marine experts, scientists and archaeologists have spent the past 15 years meticulously mapping thousands of kilometres under water in the hope of unearthing lost prehistoric tribes.

On Wednesday a crew of British and Belgian scientists set off on their voyage across the North Sea to reconstruct the ancient Mesolithic landscape hidden beneath the waves for 7,500 years. The area was submerged when thousands of cubic miles of sub-Arctic ice started to melt and sea levels began to rise.

Read The Guardian’s full article here.