How Pets Are Taking Their Thrones as the Stars of the Work-From-Home Paradigm Right Now — TIME

For those privileged enough to be able to work from home, there are still inconveniences with the new arrangement: social isolation, lack of access to free office coffee, difficulty making meetings work remotely. But it’s also introduced plenty of positives: judgment-free fashion choices, cutting the commute down to the distance between bed and desk and…

via How Pets Are Taking Their Thrones as the Stars of the Work-From-Home Paradigm Right Now — TIME

Inhuman Resources

I too have been ignored by HR personnel and interviewers following an interview: no follow up, no response to thank you emails and queries of whether a candidate has been selected.  This article underscores just how much this slight from interviewers and human resource reps can have negative repercussions on their organization-agency-company.

For those who have slighted me following an interview, I rarely use or champion their services, nor do I purchase or promote their material or products – I can’t, in good conscience, knowing how poorly they seem to treat job applicants.  If they can treat a prospective employee badly, I have to conclude that their clients or customers don’t rank too high on their ‘to do’ list either.

If I devote time to prepare presentations and material for an interview – which I always do, I expect at the very least, a confirmation from that prospective employer that they appreciated my time and attention to the interview process and that I will receive, positive or negative, a follow up call or email letting me know the application process ‘end game’.

When a company ignores your resume submission, fails to notify you of your application status or completely neglects you after a series of interviews, you never want to apply for a job there again. Last year, my firm worked with Career Arc to survey job seekers and found that 80% would be discouraged to consider…

via When companies don’t treat their job applicants well, they lose out in more ways than one — Quartz

You’ll never be able to reach your goals if you can’t forgive yourself for failing at them

Many of us will start out the New Year by making a list of resolutions—changes we want to make to be happier, such as eating better, volunteering more often, being a more attentive spouse, and so on. But, as we know, we will often fail. After a few failures we will typically give up and…

via You’ll never be able to reach your goals if you can’t forgive yourself for failing at them — Quartz

There’s strength-building in being stressed

Jason paced the corridor outside the boardroom, his palms dampening the printout of his PowerPoint presentation to the board. He could hear his pulse in his ears—boom-rush, boom-rush, and his mouth was too dry to even rehearse the opening sentence of his pitch. The last time he had felt like this, he had tried to…

via How Stress Can Make You Stronger, According to Science — TIME

A Time and Space to Think-Cape Breton December 15, 2016 — The Steeper Climb

The importance of goal-setting and striving to be better – two ‘best practices’ for the coming new year!  Bravo to The Steeper Climb for encouraging us all to ask those ‘big’ questions this time of year.

Working near the table to set new goals for the Steeper Climb for 2017: Starting with more questions than answers: What did I learn in 2016? How can I add more value to the service I offer? How can I employ youth in a meaningful way? How can I provide services in other regions? What […]

via A Time and Space to Think-Cape Breton December 15, 2016 — The Steeper Climb

For a career that makes you truly happy, find your purpose—not your passion.

As the director of career discovery at a prestigious liberal-arts school, I have the pleasure of working with hundreds of highly accomplished liberal-arts students and recent graduates as they navigate the professional world. When speaking with alums, I find they generally fall into two groups. Some have developed careers that make them feel engaged, challenged,…

via For a career that makes you truly happy, find your purpose—not your passion — Quartz

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