Ireland reclaiming its greenery with plans to plant 440 million trees by 2040 to tackle climate change — Life & Soul Magazine

The Emerald Isle is reclaiming its green as Ireland announced plans to plant 440 million trees by 2040, as part of its efforts to tackle climate change. Ireland first announced its climate plan in June, pledging to create 19,768 acres of new forestry land a year. Now the country is aiming to plant 22million trees every year […]

via Ireland reclaiming its greenery with plans to plant 440 million trees by 2040 to tackle climate change — Life & Soul Magazine

‘The Meeting of the Waters’ by Thomas Moore — Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

‘The Meeting of the Waters’ Thomas Moore There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet; O, the last rays of feeling and life must depart, Ere the bloom of that valley shall fade from my heart. Yet it was not that Nature…

via ‘The Meeting of the Waters’ by Thomas Moore — Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

Revival of the Irish Wolfhound — Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

The Irish wolfhound is a persistent symbol of ancient Celtic nobility and integrity. By the middle of the 19th century the original Irish wolfhound had all but disappeared, along with its foe the Irish wolf, and no one really had a clear idea of what it had looked like in its heyday. Around this time,…

via Revival of the Irish Wolfhound — Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

A few, perhaps unknown, facts about Ireland… — Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

The majority of people attribute the guillotine to the French, but there is evidence of it being used in Ireland almost 500 years before it made its way to France. A man named Murcod Ballagh seemingly used it for an execution near Merton in Co Galway on 1 April 1307. Dundalk Jail was built in…

via A few, perhaps unknown, facts about Ireland… — Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

The Gaelic Harp — Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

No musical instrument has ever had to carry so much baggage, surely, as the Irish harp. It has been the symbol both of Ireland under English rule and of the Irish Free State. Unadorned, on a green background, it was a rebel flag in 1916. While its earliest origins are lost, the Irish harp has…

via The Gaelic Harp — Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland