A Celebration Of Peonies — Susan Rushton

If I was forced to name my favourite flower, there’s a good chance it might be the peony. I love to see the red fronds of the herbaceous type pushing through the soil back to back together in their unearthly fashion around this time of year, full of promise for the season to come. And […]

via A Celebration Of Peonies — Susan Rushton

This Is The Time Of Year We Look Forward To — The Art Of Monteque

Jannie Vaught Most of the stone fruit trees are budding and many in flower. The Blue Bonnets are showing with their bright blue sparkles. I didn’t realize how color hungry I had become, then the first flowers and the Bonnets show and I think I’ve been living in black and white. I have 2 subjects […]

via This Is The Time Of Year We Look Forward To — The Art Of Monteque

In a Vase on Monday: White ‘n’ Blue — Rambling in the Garden

I mentioned to Christina during the week that the only blues blooming in the garden at the moment were a few Anemone blanda; however, rambling to find material for today’s vase has not only proved me wrong but shows that I don’t know my garden as intimately as I thought I did! However, as the […]

via In a Vase on Monday: White ‘n’ Blue — Rambling in the Garden

Heyrick Greatorex: The Founding Father Of Snowdrop Breeders — Susan Rushton

Heyrick Greatorex, our first known snowdrop breeder, was responsible for a series of hybrids known as the Greatorex doubles. Unlike the common, bee-made, short, dumpling-style nivalis doubles, Greatorex’s doubles dangle large, skirted flowers from tall scapes. Introduced during the 1940s and 50s (Heyrick Greatorex died in 1954), their vigour has carried most of them through […]

via Heyrick Greatorex: The Founding Father Of Snowdrop Breeders — Susan Rushton

Spring is coming… right?

We’ve had so much snow and cold temps lately that I’m wondering if I’ll see greenery or flowers before June.  In an effort to hasten Spring’s much anticipated arrival, I thought a few sentinels of Spring were in order!  The perfume wafting through the livingroom from the hyacinth plant is intoxicating!

WATER BUTTONS, BUTTONWEED (Cotula coronophifolia) — LIVING WITH NATURE (in and around Melbourne, Australia)

Water Buttons are a native of South Africa, but naturalised in all Australian states and New Zealand. These hairless, low-growing, perennial herbs flower in Winter and Spring and grow on a range of soils from sandy loam to clay, but are restricted to wet soils that are periodically flooded according to Mr Google. They generally […]

via WATER BUTTONS, BUTTONWEED (Cotula coronophifolia) — LIVING WITH NATURE (in and around Melbourne, Australia)