Q&A with Matthias Fiechter: Media and Communications Officer for the IUCN — The Jaguar

This Q&A is with one of the first conservationists who reached out to me when I started this blog: Matthias Fiechter. At the time he was the Communications Manager for the Snow Leopard Trust, but now he’s a Media and Communications Officer for the IUCN.

via Q&A with Matthias Fiechter: Media and Communications Officer for the IUCN — The Jaguar

For the Birds: DIY steps to help save birds — Birds of New England.com

Here’s the latest For the Birds column. The study released a few weeks ago that reported a 29 percent decline in the number of birds in North America since 1970 did not merely throw out some discouraging facts and leave it at that. It also included many reasons why bird populations are decreasing, most notably […]

via For the Birds: DIY steps to help save birds — Birds of New England.com

Bay Area Conservation Group Kicks Off Effort to Buy World’s Largest Remaining Private Giant Sequoia Forest — KTLA

A San Francisco conservation group has kicked off a public fundraising campaign to buy and protect the world’s largest remaining privately owned giant sequoia forest. It just needs $15 million. Save the Redwoods League announced Tuesday that it has reached an agreement to purchase the 530-acre property, known as Alder Creek, from the current owners…

via Bay Area Conservation Group Kicks Off Effort to Buy World’s Largest Remaining Private Giant Sequoia Forest — KTLA

Review of No Entry: Young-Adult Novel about Elephant Conservation — The Jaguar

No Entry is a young adult novel about Yael: a 17-year-old girl who enrolls in a conservation-training program in South Africa’s Kruger National Park. Yael learns that one of the rangers in her training program is involved in an elephant-poaching ring, which turns her world upside-down.

via Review of No Entry: Young-Adult Novel about Elephant Conservation — The Jaguar

New Study: Snow Leopard Conservation and Ecotourism — The Jaguar

Snow leopards (Panthera uncia), the ever-elusive ghosts of the mountains, are undoubtedly one of the most charismatic species on Earth. Unfortunately, they are in decline: threatened by habitat loss and degradation, climate change, decreasing availabilities of natural prey, poaching, and human-wildlife conflict. I have written about the latter threat many times. When creatures like snow […]

via New Study: Snow Leopard Conservation and Ecotourism — The Jaguar

Killing Thousands of Animals in Conservation’s Name – The Atlantic

by Emma Marris – The Atlantic (via MSN)

a close up of text on a white background
© Eric Nyquist

 

The desert of south-central Australia is crenellated with sandstone hills in shades of ivory, crimson, and apricot. The ground is littered with dead trees and tree limbs, big hunks of transparent mica, dried cow dung, and thousands of stone spearheads and blades made by the Aboriginal people who lived here for tens of thousands of years — and live here still. Around the few water holes are the doglike tracks of dingoes, wild canines that were brought to Australia thousands of years ago and are now the country’s top predators.

I have come to the Evelyn Downs ranch, on the famously remote highway between Adelaide and Alice Springs, to meet Arian Wallach, a conservationist who thinks there is too much killing in conservation. Wallach has come to this massive 888-square-mile ranch because it is one of the few places in Australia where people aren’t actively killing wild animals. Tough, outback Herefords share the landscape with kangaroos, wild horses, wild donkeys, camels, emus, cats, foxes, native rodents, dingoes, and very large antediluvian-looking reptiles called perenties. Of the animals on this list, dingoes, cats, foxes, horses, camels, and donkeys are all killed in large numbers throughout Australia — but not here. Wallach has convinced the owners to experiment with a more hands-off approach.

This is a fascinating and important article on wildlife conservation and protection.  Read the full article here.