It’s winter, it’s cold, nuff said!

img_20190131_083654It’s been a cold few days in Central Ontario, but that’s winter, and I wouldn’t want it any other way.  The bone-chilling temps and accompanying wind certainly go through a body, bringing tears to the eyes and a quickness to footsteps.

Almost everyone on the radio, TV and in the grocery line exclaim to all who will listen that winter is dreadful this year, way too cold, and with too much snow.  Maybe for some this is true, but for me.  I live in a place that seems to revel in each season.  Here,  winter isn’t ‘the end of the world’!

img_20190131_103618The country road I travel each day also sings a happy winter tune.  The snow plows, snowmobiles, snow tires in deep snow, and the sound of winter boots on packed snow are sweet notes in my ears.  I love winter equally as much as other seasons.  Despite the bone-chilling temps of late, I look forward to opening the back door in the morning and taking in that first deep breath of cold, clean winter air.  Living in the woods in the winter always makes me feel alive, invigorated and blessed.

 

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Living on the Precambrian Shield

There’s much to be thankful for living in Ontario: a landscape complete with lush forests, countless lakes and rivers, a wide variety of wildlife, cities, and country roads dotted with villages and small towns.  One of the most iconic aspects of Ontario’s landscape are the often endless rock formations.  Especially in central and northern Ontario, it’s almost impossible to look around any local roadway, field or forest without seeing rock.

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Living inland from Georgian Bay, the rocks running beneath local waterways and ground are all part of the Precambrian Shield (also called the Canadian Shield) – the ancient geological core of the North American continent.  Covering an immense portion of Ontario, the igneous rock that makes up the Shield reveals themselves along every lakeshore, roadway and almost every forest, backyard and driveway in central and northern Ontario.  This rock formation also towers above many Ontario highways.  When driving along many of Ontario’s highways and bi-ways, it’s virtually impossible not to marvel at the sheer scale of the Shield, and the immense effort it took our forefathers and construction crews to ‘get through’ the Shield in order to build central and northern roads.

Here are but a few photos of such rock beauty.