The Dinosaur that ate Ryan Zinke — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

Alexander Nazaryan as published on Yahoo News “That specimen was found in a national monument you shrunk so you could sell mining rights,” WASHINGTON — The dinosaur was a Lythronax, a fearsome predator who lived 80 million years ago. Known as the “King of Gore,” it spent its days feasting upon smaller dinosaurs on the […]

via The Dinosaur that ate Ryan Zinke — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

New Study Explores the Range Collapse of Asiatic Cheetahs — The Jaguar

Introduction The Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus) is in dire straits. There may be as few as 50 individuals left, placing this Critically Endangered subspecies on the brink of extinction. Accompanying the Asiatic cheetah’s decline has been a dramatic range reduction. While it once inhabited lands from Sinai to India, the Asiatic cheetah is now […]

via New Study Explores the Range Collapse of Asiatic Cheetahs — The Jaguar

A Drive on the Wild Side

The next time you’re driving along a country road, slow down, look, and enjoy the wild.  The wild is right there on the side of all country roads this time of year, it’s colours include yellow, cream, pink, white, purples, brown, mustard and gold.

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You don’t have to look too hard or too far to see the wild, it reaches out to gently brush against your tires with its warm foliage.  When you get out of your car and listen, you can hear the wild in the form of songbirds, singing and rejoicing among the bulrushes and marshland reeds.

There’s more to dust-ridden roadside ditches than just gravel and dirt.  Slow down and take a second look, you’ll be rewarded with an eyeful of beauty you won’t see anywhere else.

Spring’s Retreat

Like most of Ontario, cottage country received a nasty, albeit brief (I hope), reboot of winter over the last few days.  Winter tires were scheduled to come off this past Monday, then Thursday… now next Monday.  Seems winter hasn’t quite finished with us yet.  A couple of early robins arrived a few days ago to a snowy, cold, food-sparse landscape.  I hope they can hang in there a few days longer as there’s a wee bit of spring warmth coming – by mid-April.

The gardens are longing to shed their winter coat and get on with extolling spring’s promise of sunny, smiling daffodils and crocuses.


Backyard vegetation and garden bench covered with new snow.


Alas, this last breath of winter has been breathtakingly beautiful.

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Copyright @ Linda Sullivan

Now go away winter, see you in November!

February: winter’s showcase

As someone born in the month of sun and cold, I declare February to be winter’s showcase month!  Yes It’s cold, but the combination of bright skies upon the snow-laden landscape is unmatched.  Soon, spring will blanket the fields with green, and the lakes and rivers will flow again.  But for now, snow cover allows nature to rest, rejuvenate and replenish her strength.

I am grateful for winter.

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Winter: harsh, but beautiful

Winter in central and northern Ontario is nothing short of amazing.  Yes, it’s often cold, the driving can often be tricky and, sometimes, downright hazardous, but there’s no disputing the beauty that befalls the subdued landscape when snow descends upon it from above.  As much as I miss those warm spring and early summer days, I do so love the crispness and quiet beauty of a cold winter’s day.

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There’s something quite humbling about a cold February day, with the sunshine tricking one into believing it’s warmer than it is while at the same time, casting gloriously bright sunlight across open spaces and upon snow-laden trees, lakes and roadways.

Spring brings flowers, summer the warmth, Fall, beautiful leaf colours, but winter, winter brings silence, a time of renewal, contemplation, and the promise of new life and growth in but a few short weeks.

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