Galloping across the steppes — TwilightBeasts

Around 50 million years ago, long before the Epoch of the Twilight Beasts, a little mammal, Eohippus, scurried about in the forests of North America. This creature, about the size of an average dog, was the ancestor of the magnificent horse we know today. During this Period, called the Eocene, the environment and climate was […]

via Galloping across the steppes — TwilightBeasts

Globe trotter — TwilightBeasts

Horses are one of Europe’s last big mammals. They shouldn’t really be here: they should have vanished a long time ago with most of the other large mammals from the Pleistocene. Europe once had herds of gigantic, hairy mammoths; solitary, shaggy woolly rhinoceros; deer with antlers wider than I am tall; and so many more. […]

via Globe trotter — TwilightBeasts

‘Siberian unicorn’ walked Earth with humans — BBC News – Science & Environment

By Helen Briggs
BBC News

Artist's impression of the 'forgotten beast'
W S Van der Merwe
Artist’s impression of the ‘forgotten beast’

 

A giant rhino that may have been the origin of the unicorn myth survived until about 35,000 years ago.

via ‘Siberian unicorn’ walked Earth with humans — BBC News – Science & Environment

Scientists Unveil Ancient Sea Monsters Found In Angola — News : NPR

Almost 100 million years ago, when the South Atlantic Ocean was young, giant reptiles prowled the seas. Scientists have found a trove of these ancient creatures in the African nation of Angola.(Image credit: Madeleine Cook/NPR)

via Scientists Unveil Ancient Sea Monsters Found In Angola — News : NPR

How Birds-To-Be Get Oxygen Inside Eggs

Your body needs oxygen to function — and that was true even before you were born. As you grew inside your mother’s womb, even before you had working lungs, your cells were crying out for oxygen. And your mother kindly answered that call. Oxygen and nutrients from her blood made their way down your umbilical cord, through your belly button, and fueled your body.

Now consider a chick — before it has hatched. It’s cut off from its mother by a hard shell and a couple membranes. There’s no way for the hen to get her still-developing offspring the oxygen it desperately needs; the pre-hatchling is on its own.

So why don’t bird embryos suffocate inside their eggs?

In Skunk Bear’s newest episode, we use the magic of animation to take you inside an egg and explore the delicate system that keeps these little things alive.

 


Read original article here.

Geologists find clues that early humans island-hopped their way into the Americas

How and when did early humans first arrive in the Americas? The answer may lie along the Northern America’s Pacific Coast. Experts believe early humans travelled from Siberia to Alaska across a land bridge. But what happened next has been far more difficult to pinpoint. The conventional story suggests the earliest North American settlers then…

via Geologists find clues that early humans island-hopped their way into the Americas — Quartz