These Canadians flew in a secret WWII mission to destroy German dams – thestar.com

by Ted Barris – Excerpt from Dam Busters – via msn.com

a group of people in uniform posing for a photo: Sixteen of the surviving Dam Busters were pictured at the English airfield the day they returned from the raid. All in this photo were Canadian except American Joe McCarthy (second from right in back row), who had trained in Canada.
© Provided by Toronto Star Newspapers Limited Sixteen of the surviving Dam Busters were pictured at the English airfield the day they returned from the raid. All in this photo were Canadian except American Joe McCarthy (second from right in back row), who had trained in Canada.

On May 16, 1943, an unprecedented operation was launched by Squadron 617 of the Royal Air Force. The mission was to destroy three German dams in the Ruhr Valley with a new kind of bomb, dropped from a low-flying Lancaster, to cause flooding and chaos, disrupt key industries and possibly shorten the Second World War. In Dam Busters, Ted Barris tells the dramatic story with a focus on the large number of pilots, engineers, navigators and bombers on the mission who were Canadian or trained in Canada.

Read Ted Barris’s full article here to learn more about these brave young Canadians and how their efforts helped stem German advances and lead Canada and the Allies to victory.

Alberta’s Free Roaming Horses Society takes legal action to save Canada’s wild horses (wildies) — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

Source: Alberta’s Free Roaming Horses Society Alberta’s Free Roaming Horses Society and have just begun legal action against the Alberta Provincial Government for, what appears to be, a violation of their Statutes and Regulations with regards to capturing and removing the wild horses from Public Lands. They have been gathering documentation from Freedom of Information Requests […]

via Alberta’s Free Roaming Horses Society takes legal action to save Canada’s wild horses (wildies) — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

Living on the Precambrian Shield

There’s much to be thankful for living in Ontario: a landscape complete with lush forests, countless lakes and rivers, a wide variety of wildlife, cities, and country roads dotted with villages and small towns.  One of the most iconic aspects of Ontario’s landscape are the often endless rock formations.  Especially in central and northern Ontario, it’s almost impossible to look around any local roadway, field or forest without seeing rock.

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Living inland from Georgian Bay, the rocks running beneath local waterways and ground are all part of the Precambrian Shield (also called the Canadian Shield) – the ancient geological core of the North American continent.  Covering an immense portion of Ontario, the igneous rock that makes up the Shield reveals themselves along every lakeshore, roadway and almost every forest, backyard and driveway in central and northern Ontario.  This rock formation also towers above many Ontario highways.  When driving along many of Ontario’s highways and bi-ways, it’s virtually impossible not to marvel at the sheer scale of the Shield, and the immense effort it took our forefathers and construction crews to ‘get through’ the Shield in order to build central and northern roads.

Here are but a few photos of such rock beauty.

Of all the coneflowers, in all the gardens, you fly onto mine

I haven’t seen many butterflies thus far this year, so a few days ago I was excited to be  treated to a wonderful scene on my garden coneflower.  This beauty alighted and fed for a long time, but she wasn’t alone as another little flying beauty was also admiring the echinacea.

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Photo Credit: Linda Sullivan 

The monarch and the bee had a bit of an aerial scuffle, but soon the bee moved onto some other tasty wildflowers and the butterfly was left to alight and feed for an extended period of time.


If you stop, look and feel nature for even just a short amount of time, you’ll experience a little, glorious heavenly shudder in your very soul.

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Spring’s Retreat

Like most of Ontario, cottage country received a nasty, albeit brief (I hope), reboot of winter over the last few days.  Winter tires were scheduled to come off this past Monday, then Thursday… now next Monday.  Seems winter hasn’t quite finished with us yet.  A couple of early robins arrived a few days ago to a snowy, cold, food-sparse landscape.  I hope they can hang in there a few days longer as there’s a wee bit of spring warmth coming – by mid-April.

The gardens are longing to shed their winter coat and get on with extolling spring’s promise of sunny, smiling daffodils and crocuses.


Backyard vegetation and garden bench covered with new snow.


Alas, this last breath of winter has been breathtakingly beautiful.

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Copyright @ Linda Sullivan

Now go away winter, see you in November!

February: winter’s showcase

As someone born in the month of sun and cold, I declare February to be winter’s showcase month!  Yes It’s cold, but the combination of bright skies upon the snow-laden landscape is unmatched.  Soon, spring will blanket the fields with green, and the lakes and rivers will flow again.  But for now, snow cover allows nature to rest, rejuvenate and replenish her strength.

I am grateful for winter.

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Winter’s Hardships

Winter weather has enveloped wild horse country along with the cold tempatures and the snow has really started to accumulate. As the snow pack deepens it becomes more challenging for all the wildlife including the wild horses. Using their broad hooves, they must dig through the snow to find forage. In conditions like this […]

via Winter’s Hardships — The Wild Horses of Alberta Society